• VGP - Crossroads Animal Clinic - MO
  • 7523 W Farm Road 170,
  • Republic,
  • Missouri,
  • 65738
  • Phone: 555-555-5555

Library

Infectious Diseases

  • Abnormal droppings are a non-specific sign of illness in birds. Causes may range from a dietary intake of excess fruits to bacterial or viral intestinal infections and heavy metal toxicity. Any changes in the color or consistency of your bird's droppings should be addressed by your avian veterinarian.

  • Anaplasmosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the infectious bacterial organism Anaplasma phagocytophilum. It is transmitted through bites of the deer tick (also known as the black-legged tick) and the Western black-legged tick. A lesser form of anaplasmosis is caused by Anaplasma platys and is transmitted by the brown dog tick. Dogs with anaplasmosis often have many of the same symptoms as those with Lyme disease, and infection with both agents (co-infection) is not uncommon.

  • Anthrax is a bacterial infection that rarely affects cats. It is not a new infection but has been revisited due to concerns about bioterrorism. Infection in cats usually occurs through ingestion of infected carcasses, causing clinical signs such as vomiting, diarrhea, and swelling of the face and neck. Treatment is highly effective in the early stages of infection.

  • Anthrax is a bacterial infection that can affect dogs if exposed to large amounts of bacterial-produced spores such as by terrorist attack or ingesting large quantities from infected meat. The organism that causes anthrax, Bacillus anthracis, produces spores that are resistant to typical disinfection methods and heat. These spores can last up to 40 years in the environment. Anthrax is usually spread through inhalation or ingestion of spores from infected meat, although cutaneous exposure can occur. Symptoms depend on the type of exposure and can include: black skin pustules, pneumonia, acute gastroenteritis with hemorrhagic vomiting and diarrhea, oral ulcerations, fever, weight loss, swelling of the neck, face and head and ultimately sepsis and death if not treated. Treatment requires antibiotics and can be highly effective in early stages. There currently is no canine vaccine.

  • Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are bacterial infections that are minimally or no longer responsive to commonly used antibiotics. Although these bacterial infections occur naturally, the frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics accelerates the process. Cats with certain medical conditions may also be predisposed.

  • Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are bacterial infections that are minimally or no longer responsive to commonly used antibiotics. Although these bacterial infections occur naturally, the frequent and/or inappropriate use of antibiotics accelerates the process. Dogs with certain medical conditions may also be predisposed.

  • Primary vaccination is essential to prevent the return of once common deadly infectious diseases in kittens and cats. Recent research indicates that not all vaccines require yearly boosters. However, there is no evidence that annual booster vaccination is anything but beneficial to most cats. Published research has conclusively shown that abstaining from some boosters can put your cat at risk.

  • Primary vaccination is essential to prevent the once common deadly diseases in puppies. However, recent research indicates that not all vaccines require yearly boosters. There is no evidence that annual booster vaccination is anything but beneficial to most dogs. Published research has shown conclusively that abstaining from some boosters can put your dog at risk.

  • Aspergillosis is a severe and sometimes life-threatening fungal infection that commonly causes respiratory disease in pet birds. Infected birds may show respiratory signs, including tail bobbing, difficulty breathing, and coughing. Several diagnostic tests are available, but surgical laparoscopy is the most accurate. Aspergillosis is a very challenging disease to treat and even more difficult to cure. In many cases, referral to an avian specialist is advised.

  • This handout discusses aspergillosis in cats, an infection, growth, or allergic response caused by the Aspergillus fungus. If your cat becomes infected, it can be confined to the nasal passages (nasal aspergillosis), or it can spread throughout the body (systemic aspergillosis). The clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of both conditions are outlined.